Research Highlights

Red ochre

Students reproduce traditional wood finishes by B.C.’s First Nations

With help from the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at UBC, Lee and Lube, graduate students in chemical engineering and wood science, collected a number of natural pigments that First Nations people along the coast of the Pacific Northwest would have used to paint totem poles or other decorative wooden objects.

Deer: Beautiful, destructive and driving evolutionary change

Deer: Beautiful, destructive and driving evolutionary change

For many individuals, seeing deer in the wild provides joy and a sense of connection to nature. However, deer also cause hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to gardeners, farmers and insurance companies and dramatically change forest and prairie ecosystems
through trampling, browsing and grazing.

Seagull populations halved since 1980s

Seagull populations halved since 1980s

The number of seagulls in the Strait of Georgia is down by 50 per cent from the 1980s. Dr Peter Arcesse say the decline reflects changes in the availability of food.

Arcesse and other researchers collected 100 years of data on population numbers of Glaucous-winged Gulls, the most common seagull species found in the Lower Mainland, Victoria, Nanaimo and elsewhere in the region.

Climate Proofing Cities

Climate Proofing Cities

With rising temperatures and rapidly growing cities, a new breed of ‘urban foresters’ are needed to help create safe, livable, attractive, and sustainable cities. Learn More