Sarah Dickson-Hoyle

Are you the world's
next top PhD student?

Sarah Dickson-Hoyle
Future Forest Fellowship Recipient

Future Forests Fellowship

Future Forests Fellowship

As one of the world’s top forestry schools, the Faculty of Forestry at the University of British Columbia is giving away the largest single grant (up to $280,000) for a forestry student.

University of British Columbia
Vancouver Campus

The fellowship recipient will enroll in our PhD program and conduct research focused in British Columbia in one of the following areas:

Forest Products Biotechnology  – Bioenergy – Forest Genomics – Climate Change – Urban Forestry – Forest Management – Conservation – Forested Landscapes – Salmon Ecology – Forest Health – Forests and Indigenous Peoples – Forests and Human Health

Join us at a top-ranking university and faculty

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UBC is ranked in the top 35 research universities in the world

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UBC Forestry is ranked in the top 3 forestry schools in the world

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UBC Forestry received $12.7 million in research funding in 2020/21

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Vancouver, Canada is the 3rd most livable city in the world

Application Information

Applications are currently closed. Applications will reopen on August 1, 2022.

Meet Sara Barron – Past Fellowship Recipient

Sara Barron

Sara Barron

Canada

Balancing forest environments and high-density housing

Urban forestry research is currently focusing on quantifying the myriad benefits of trees in urban neighbourhoods. Much important research is focusing on quantifying the positive benefits of urban forests in terms of climate change mitigation, such as their ability to mitigate the urban heat island effect, sequester carbon dioxide, provide shade to reduce energy needs to condition buildings, and even provide a renewable bioenergy source.

Learn about some of our PhD students

Douglas Bolton

Douglas Bolton

Douglas Bolton

Canada

Assessing forest structure from above 

Forests play a critical role in the global carbon cycle by regulating carbon exchanges between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. While carbon sequestration is a vital ecosystem service provided by forests, the future of forest carbon dynamics remains uncertain in the face of a changing climate. Specifically, changes in forest productivity, disturbance regimes, and continued land conversion are expected to alter rates of carbon sequestration and carbon storage in the world’s forests.

Andrea Lyall

Andrea Lyall

Andrea Lyall

Canada

Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation’s (KHFN) Relationship with the Forests

Andrea is using indigenous and transformative methodologies to frame culturally relevant protocols and forest governance structure that address and embrace KHFN’s relationship to the forests as a Kwakwaka’wakw Nation.

Alex Chee Yu Yeung

Alex Chee Yu Yeung

Alex Chee Yu Yeung

China

Effects of forest harvesting on stream ecosystem structure and functioning

The overall theme of my PhD research is centred on how forest disturbance alters the ecosystem stability of headwater and riparian ecosystems, and the variations of its drivers across multiple spatial (reach, watershed and regional) and temporal scales. In view of the strong forest-aquatic connectivity in the source waters, I seek to develop a mechanistic understanding of how different forest harvesting practices affect multiple structural and functional indicators of stream health, including macroinvertebrate abundance and richness, organic matter decomposition and nutrient processing.